Vinyl Record and Rare LP Resource Ideal For Serious Collectors

Most Recent Additions to the Vinyl Records DB

Soultrane
New - LP - OJC-021
Sealed 2024 vinyl reissue. (Likely a run of the 2015 reissue) "In Addition To Being Bandmates Within Miles Davis' Mid-'50s Quintet, John Coltrane (Tenor Sax) And Red Garland (Piano) Head Up A Session Featuring Members From A Concurrent Version Of The Red Garland Trio: Paul Chambers (Bass) And Art Taylor (Drums). This Was The Second Date To Feature The Core Of This Band. A Month Earlier, Several Sides Were Cut That Would End Up On Coltrane's Lush Life Album. Soultrane Offers A Sampling Of Performance Styles And Settings From Coltrane And Crew. As With A Majority Of His Prestige Sessions, There Is A Breakneck-tempo Bop Cover (In This Case An Absolute Reworking Of Irving Berlin's "Russian Lullaby"), A Few Smoldering Ballads (Such As "I Want To Talk About You" And "Theme For Ernie"), As Well As A Mid-tempo Romp ("Good Bait"). Each Of These Sonic Textures Displays A Different Facet Of Not Only The Musical Kinship Between Coltrane And Garland But In The Relationship That Coltrane Has With The Music. The Bop-heavy Solos That Inform "Good Bait," As Well As The "Sheets Of Sound" Technique That Was Named For The Fury In Coltrane's Solos On The Rendition Of "Russian Lullaby" Found Here, Contain The Same Intensity As The More Languid And Considerate Phrasings Displayed Particularly Well On "I Want To Talk About You." As Time Will Reveal, This Sort Of Manic Contrast Would Become A Significant Attribute Of Coltrane's Unpredictable Performance Style. Not Indicative Of The Quality Of This Set Is The Observation That, Because Of The Astounding Coltrane Solo Works That Both Precede And Follow Soultrane -- Most Notably Lush Life And Blue Train -- The Album Has Perhaps Not Been Given The Exclusive Attention It So Deserves." All Music Guide - Lindsay Planer. ... more
Can't Buy A Thrill
Used - LP - MCA 37040
Clean 1980 Non-Gatefold Reissue. No Bar Code On Back Cover. The ground breaking debut from the unknown band Steely Dan hit the airwaves and immediately made waves. With the big songs "Reeling In The Years" and "Do It Again" they never looked back. ... more
Rising Son
New Import - FW288
Sealed 2024 2LP gatefold reissue from UK based First Word records. The first ever reissue of the impossibly hard to find modern Blue Note release! Recommended! Features a bonus remix of "Everybody Loves The Sunshine" by Joe Armon-Jones. "Japan-born/N.Y.C.-based trumpeter Takuya Kuroda's Blue Note Records debut, 2014's Rising Son, is a funky, soul and hip-hop-infused affair featuring production from acclaimed jazz vocalist José James. Longtime collaborators, Kuroda and James met while students at Manhattan's New School for Jazz and Contemporary Music, and Kuroda later toured with James and wrote the horn arrangements for his 2012 album, No Beginning No End. Technically, Rising Son is Kuroda's fourth album after three previous independent releases that found him working through a more swinging, post-bop jazz sound, with the occasional funk-inflected diversion. On Rising Son, Kuroda delves deep into a '70s fusion, funk, and Afro-beat-influenced sound that is at once contemporary and vintage in approach. In many ways, the sound of Rising Son has a lot in common with James' own soul-jazz style, and his guest spot on Roy Ayers' "Everybody Loves the Sunshine" is certainly a highlight of the album. However, while there is palpable synergistic energy at play between James and Kuroda, it's Kuroda's assured, dynamic trumpet playing that grabs the spotlight on Rising Son. Backing Kuroda here is his working ensemble featuring trombonist Corey King, Rhodes keyboardist Kris Bowers, bassist Solomon Dorsey, and drummer Nate Smith. Together, Kuroda and his band play a clipped, muscular funk-jazz that shows the influence of artists like African-legend Hugh Masekela and trumpeter Roy Hargrove. Tracks like the Latin-tinged "Mala" and the frenetic "Afro Blues" (which showcases a guest appearance by famed West African guitarist Lionel Loueke) are hypnotic, pulsing, and joyous. Many of the songs on Rising Son have a modern, dance-ready sheen to them, with James pushing the drums to the front of the mix and cradling Kuroda and King's horns in a rounded, almost phaser-like mike sound. While some hip-hop-influenced jazz can seem rhythmically static, sacrificing improvisation for beats, the tracks on Rising Son never get too smooth. James leaves just enough organic grit in the mix to remind you that that this is live, improvisational music, not that you'd forget with Kuroda bursting through many of these cuts with a puckered intensity. And while this is unquestionably a jazz album, nothing on Rising Son feels like an intellectual harmonic exercise, as so many recordings by post-collegiate jazz artists sometimes do. Whether further illuminating the soul of Roy Ayers, or slipping ever deeper into the romantic slow jam of his own "Sometime Somewhere Somehow," Kuroda reveals himself to be a gifted melodicist with an abiding trust in groove, not to mention trumpet chops and charisma to spare. Ultimately, Rising Son isn't just Kuroda's major-label debut, it's a major artistic statement." AMG - Matt Collar. ... more
Please Please Me
New - LP - 094638241614
Sealed, Latest Run Of The 2012 180gm Remastered Stereo Reissue."Once "Please Please Me" rocketed to number one, the Beatles rushed to deliver a debut album, bashing out Please Please Me in a day. Decades after its release, the album still sounds fresh, precisely because of its intense origins. As the songs rush past, it's easy to get wrapped up in the sound of the record itself without realizing how the album effectively summarizes the band's eclectic influences. Naturally, the influences shine through their covers, all of which are unconventional and illustrate the group's superior taste. There's a love of girl groups, vocal harmonies, sophisticated popcraft, schmaltz, R&B, and hard-driving rock & roll, which is enough to make Please Please Me impressive, but what makes it astonishing is how these elements converge in the originals. "I Saw Here Standing There" is one of their best rockers, yet it has surprising harmonies and melodic progressions. "Misery" and "There's a Place" grow out of the girl group tradition without being tied to it. A few of their originals, such as "Do You Want to Know a Secret" and the pleasantly light "P.S. I Love You," have dated slightly, but endearingly so, since they're infused with cheerful innocence and enthusiasm. And there is an innocence to Please Please Me. The Beatles may have played notoriously rough dives in Hamburg, but the only way you could tell that on their first album was how the constant gigging turned the group into a tight, professional band that could run through their set list at the drop of a hat with boundless energy. It's no surprise that Lennon had shouted himself hoarse by the end of the session, barely getting through "Twist and Shout," the most famous single take in rock history. He simply got caught up in the music, just like generations of listeners did." All Music Guide - Stephen Thomas Erlewine ... more
Dark Matter
New - LP - 602458971163
Sealed 2024 standard black vinyl edition, custom hype sticker on shrink. "Dark Matter arrives relatively quickly on the heels of Gigaton, an urgent warning call coincidentally delivered at the dawn of the COVID-19 pandemic. Teeming with apoplectic energy, Gigaton activated Pearl Jam's collective muscle memory, tapping into the messianic fervor that ran through the band's earliest records. Dark Matter doesn't traffic in that sense of righteousness, choosing instead to concentrate on replicating the sound and form of their '90s heyday. The conduit for this conversion is Andrew Watt, a producer who wasn't yet a year old when Pearl Jam released Ten, who nevertheless cultivated a reputation as a classic rock rejuvenator partially due to records like Earthling, Eddie Vedder's bright and colorful solo record from 2022. After Earthling, Watt managed to shepherd records by Ozzy Osbourne, Iggy Pop, and the Rolling Stones that felt like their iconic work while also still sounding fresh. He repeats that trick on Dark Matter, crafting a record that hints at the heights of Ten and Vs. without precisely sounding like either -- there's too much sonic separation, too much punch, too much digital sheen to be mistaken for a Brendan O'Brien production. Pearl Jam is older, too. Not only are they not as interested in exorcising demons, but they're also unlikely to stray from their chosen path. Lacking the aimless detours that gave Vs. and Vitalogy an off-kilter charm, Dark Matter is streamlined and purposeful, never overstaying its welcome on either the ballads or rockers. While that can be a slight detriment on the album's loudest number -- combined, the sleek sound and concise compositions give the faintest suggestion of restraint -- the efficiency is ultimately to the band's benefit, highlighting their empathetic interplay by pushing melodies and hooks to the forefront. "Scared of Fear" and "React, Respond" provide a bracing opening to the record but Dark Matter is at its most compelling at its quietest moments ("Setting Sun" provides a suitably contemplative closer) and on "Waiting for Stevie," a song that summons Pearl Jam's inherent sense of majestic melodrama. "Waiting for Stevie" suggests the days where the horizon seems boundless, an aesthetic that used to be the unifying force on Pearl Jam records, but here it's used as an effective flair on an album that, above all, aims to please. That impulse is rare for Pearl Jam and it's satisfying to hear them play to their strengths throughout Dark Matter." All Music Guide - Stephen Thomas Erlewine ... more
Beatles For Sale
New - LP - 0094638241416
Sealed, Latest Run of The 2012 180gm Stereo Reissue Housed In A Gatefold Jacket. Custom Hype Sticker On Shrink. "It was inevitable that the constant grind of touring, writing, promoting, and recording would grate on the Beatles, but the weariness of Beatles for Sale comes as something of a shock. Only five months before, the group released the joyous A Hard Day's Night. Now, they sound beaten, worn, and, in Lennon's case, bitter and self-loathing. His opening trilogy ("No Reply," "I'm a Loser," "Baby's in Black") is the darkest sequence on any Beatles record, setting the tone for the album. Moments of joy pop up now and again, mainly in the forms of covers and the dynamic "Eight Days a Week," but the very presence of six covers after the triumphant all-original A Hard Day's Night feels like an admission of defeat or at least a regression. (It doesn't help that Lennon's cover of his beloved obscurity "Mr. Moonlight" winds up as arguably the worst thing the group ever recorded.) Beneath those surface suspicions, however, there are some important changes on Beatles for Sale, most notably Lennon's discovery of Bob Dylan and folk-rock. The opening three songs, along with "I Don't Want to Spoil the Party," are implicitly confessional and all quite bleak, which is a new development. This spirit winds up overshadowing McCartney's cheery "I'll Follow the Sun" or the thundering covers of "Rock & Roll Music," "Honey Don't," and "Kansas City/Hey-Hey-Hey-Hey!," and the weariness creeps up in unexpected places -- "Every Little Thing," "What You're Doing," even George's cover of Carl Perkins' "Everybody's Trying to Be My Baby" -- leaving the impression that Beatlemania may have been fun but now the group is exhausted. That exhaustion results in the group's most uneven album, but its best moments find them moving from Merseybeat to the sophisticated pop/rock they developed in mid-career." All Music Guide - Stephen Thomas Erlewine ... more
Hot Fuss
New - LP - B0026979-01
Sealed 2023 standard black reissue, no hype sticker. "There are so many garage rock/dance-rock tunes perfectly stylized and glamorous for the pop kids in the city and in the suburbs of new-millennium America. What's nice about these the bands producing these songs is how they strive so desperately to individualize themselves. On a commercial level, they do quite well in delivering catchy pop hooks. When it comes to having actual talent, a select few actually do possess attention-worthy integrity. But there are others who don't, and they disappear from the American consciousness after a brief flirtation with success. Such theories, however, are left up to the individual music fan, so let's put that aside for a moment to experience the decadent pop world of the Killers. The Las Vegas foursome introduce a perfectly tailored new wave-induced art rock sound on their debut, Hot Fuss. They wooed MTV audiences and modern rock followers with the success of "Somebody Told Me" during summer 2004. This chunky-riffed single loaded with androgynous mystery and a dalliance with new romantic energy captures the infectious delivery of the Killers as a band. Vocalist/keyboardist Brandon Flowers does his best Simon LeBon imitation; the sex appeal and the boyish charm are perfectly in place as the rest of the band accents his rich, red-hotness just so. "Jenny Was a Friend of Mine" and "Mr. Brightside" are equally as foxy as the album's first single, affirming that a formula is indeed in motion. It's hard to deny the sparkle of Depeche Mode beats and the sensual allure of Duran Duran. After 25 years, those sounds still hold up; by 2004, however, it's an incredible task to pull this kind of thing off without selling yourself to the tastes of the masses. Interpol and the Walkmen have pulled it off; Franz Ferdinand and Hot Hot Heat have potential. The difference with the Killers is that the dynamic doesn't firmly hold together. The gospel/rock jaunt of "All These Things That I've Done" doesn't quite fit around the Cure-inspired synth reveries of "Everything Will Be Alright" and "Believe Me Natalie." "Midnight Show," as much as it plucks from Duran Duran's "Planet Earth" and "Is There Something I Should Know?," does show promise for the Killers. Hot Fuss came at the right time because the pop kids needed something to savor the summer with, and "Somebody Told Me" served that purpose. Now pull out your Duran Duran records and dance like no one is watching." All Music Guide - MacKenzie Wilson ... more
Greatest Hits
New - LP - 88697-36921-1
Sealed, Latest Run Of The 2009 2LP Embossed Gatefold With Hype Sticker On The Shrink Wrap. Includes Three Previously Unreleased Tracks: "Wheels," "Word Forward" And "Everlong" (Solo Acoustic Version). "Almost 15 years on from their debut, Foo Fighters deliver their first Greatest Hits, a 15-track (16 if the double dip on "Everlong" counts) retrospective covering their six albums from 1995 to 2007. Greatest Hits isn't arranged chronologically, which isn't a detriment; if anything, skipping through the years emphasizes just how consistent the Foos have been, always delivering oversized rock & roll where the hooks are as big as the guitars. The only exceptions to the rule are the two lo-fi cuts "Big Me" and "This Is a Call," with "I'll Stick Around" qualifying as this comp's inexplicable omission ("Walking After You," "DOA," "Stacked Actors," and "No Way Back" all also didn't make the cut), plucked from their 1995 debut, where the band was only Dave Grohl recording at home. Apart from this pair of tunes, this is all muscular, melodic modern rock, the kind that Foo Fighters almost patented, and if their consistency has occasionally made their albums blend together, it does result in one strong hits collection." All Music Guide - Stephen Thomas Erlewine ... more
This Is The Modern World
New Import - 999369
Sealed 2021 EU import pressed on 180gm clear vinyl. Custom hype sticker on shrink. Includes 8 bonus tracks taken from the Jam's live sessions at the BBC from 1977-1981. "As is so often the case for overnight successes, the Jam rush-recorded their sophomore effort during a hurried schedule to capitalize on the debut. This, combined with Paul Weller's various personal distractions and temporary lack of interest, led to less than satisfying results, especially in comparison to In the City. This Is the Modern World can be faulted for borrowed Who licks, pale rewrites of the debut, somewhat clichéd sloganeering, and unfinished ideas, but there were still some moments of inspiration, especially in more introspective Weller songs like "Life From a Window" and "I Need You (For Someone)" -- both songs feature personal sentiments that the debut was clearly missing. This Is the Modern World is a flawed album by Jam standards, but it would certainly have received praise had it been released by another band. [The U.S. edition added the single "All Around the World" and features a different track order.]" AMG - Chris Woodstra ... more
Crime Of The Century
New - LP - B0022235-01
Sealed 2014 40th anniversary reissue pressed on 180gm vinyl. Custom yellow hype sticker on shrink. "Supertramp came into their own on their third album, 1974's Crime of the Century, as their lineup gelled but, more importantly, so did their sound. The group still betrayed a heavy Pink Floyd influence, particularly in its expansive art rock arrangements graced by saxophones, but Supertramp isn't nearly as spooky as Floyd -- they're snarky collegiate elitists, an art rock variation on Steely Dan or perhaps a less difficult 10cc, filled with cutting jokes and allusions, best heard on "Bloody Well Right." This streak would later flourish on Breakfast in America, but it's present enough to give them their own character. Also present is a slight sentimental streak and a heavy fondness for pop, heard on "Dreamer," a soaring piece of art pop that became their first big hit. That and "Bloody Well Right" are the concise pop moments on the record; the rest of Crime of the Century is atmospheric like Dark Side of the Moon, but with a lighter feel and a Beatles bent. At times the album floats off into its own world, with an effect more tedious than hypnotic, but it's still a huge leap forward for the group and their most consistent album outside of that 1979 masterwork, Breakfast in America." SMG - Stephen Thomas Erlewine ... more

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