Stapleton, Chris

Vinyl Records and Rare LPs:

From A Room: Volume 1
New - LP - B0026379-01
Sealed Repress Of The 2017 Volume 1 Release. "When His 2015 Cma Wins For Album Of The Year, New Artist Of The Year, And Male Vocalist Of The Year Turned Chris Stapleton Into An Overnight Sensation, It Raised The Expectations For The Sequel To His Debut Traveller Considerably. Released Two Years To The Day After Traveller, From A Room: Volume 1 Surprises With Its Modesty. Yes, It's The First Installment Of A Two-part Album -- A Move That, By Definition, Suggests Some Level Of Heightened Ambition -- But From A Room: Volume 1 Benefits From Its Lean 32-Minute Running Time, Its Brevity Shifting Attention To The Sturdiness Of Its Nine Songs. Stapleton Revives His Traveller Blueprint, Adhering To The Worn, Leathery Sound Of '70s Outlaw Country, But His Success Has Slowed His Roll, Allowing Him To Proceed With A Quiet Confidence. Most Of The Album Does Move At A Leisurely Pace, With The Bruised Ballad "Broken Halos" Setting The Tone For The Rest Of The Record. A Sly Cover Of "Last Thing I Needed, First Thing This Morning" -- A 1982 Hit For Willie Nelson -- Builds Upon This Contemplative Mood And He Returns To It Frequently, Whether It's On The Skeletal "Either Way" Or The Simmering Tension Of The Closing "Death Row." Stapleton Expands Upon This Rumination By Offering A Couple Of Soulful Heartbreak Numbers -- "I Was Wrong" And "Without Your Love" -- An Old-fashioned Barroom Lament ("Up To No Good Livin'"), And A Pair Of Rowdy, Funny Blues-Rockers ("Second One To Know," "These Stems") That Give From A Room: Volume 1 Dimension And Color. As Good As Each Of These Songs Is Individually -- And There Isn't A Bad Song In The Bunch -- What's Best About From A Room: Volume 1 Is How It Holds Together. There's No Grand Concept Here: It's Just A Collection Of Good Tunes, Delivered Simply And Soulfully, And That's More Than Enough." AMG - Stephen Thomas Erlewine. more
From A Room: Volume 2
New - LP - B0027408-01
Sealed 2017 Pressing With Hype Sticker. more
Starting Over
New - LP - B0032690-01
Sealed 2020 180gm 2LP Gatefold, With Limited Edition Slipmat. more
Starting Over
New - LP - B0032689-01
Sealed 2020 180gm 2LP gatefold original. more
Starting Over
New - LP - B0032689-01
Sealed 2020 180gm 2LP Gatefold.  more
Traveller
Used - LP - B0019405-01
2015 2LP Gatefold. His Debut Came Out Strong With His Style Of Classic Country Music Mixed With Southern Rock And Blues Influences Accompanied By A Soulful Voice. more
Traveller
New - LP - B0019405-01
Sealed 2020 180gm 2LP Reissue/Repress. "Like Many Country Troubadours, Chris Stapleton Cut His Teeth As A Songwriter In Nashville, Churning Out Tunes That Wound Up Hits In The Hands Of Others. Kenny Chesney Brought "Never Wanted Anything More" To Number One And Darius Rucker Had A Hit With "Come Back Song," But Those Associations Suggest Stapleton Would Toe A Mainstream Line When He Recorded His 2015 Debut, Traveller. This New Release, However, Suggests Something Rougher And Rowdier -- An Eric Church Without A Metallic Fixation Or A Sturgill Simpson Stripped Of Arty Psychedelic Affectations. Something Closer To A Jamey Johnson, In Other Words, But Where Johnson Often Seems Weighed Down By The Mantle Of A Latter-day Outlaw, Stapleton Is Rather Lithe As He Slides Between All Manners Of Southern Styles. Some Of This Smoothness Derives From Stapleton's Supple Singing. As The Rare Songwriter-for-hire Who Also Has Considerable Performance Chops, Stapleton Is Sensitive To The Needs Of An Individual Song, Something That Is Evident When He's Covering "Tennessee Whiskey" -- A Dean Dillon & Linda Hargrove Tune Popularized By George Jones And David Allan Coe In The Early '80s -- Lending The Composition A Welcome Smolder, But The Strength Of Traveller Lies In How He Can Similarly Modulate The Execution Of His Originals. He Has A Variety Of Songs Here, Too, Casually Switching Gears Between Bluegrass Waltz, Southern Rockers, Crunching Blues, Soulful Slow-burners, And Swaggering Outlaw Anthems -- Every One Of Them Belonging To A Tradition, But None Sounding Musty Due To Stapleton's Casualness. Never Once Does He Belabor His Range, Nor Does He Emphasize The Sharply Sculpted Songs. Everything Flows Naturally, And That Ease Is So Alluring Upon The First Spin Of Traveller That It's Not Until Repeated Visits That The Depth Of The Album Becomes Apparent." AMG - Stephen Thomas Erlewine. more
Traveller
New - LP - B0033977-01
Sealed 2020 Reissue With Exclusive Vinyl Slipmat.  more
Traveller
New - LP - B0019405-01
Sealed 2020 180gm 2LP Reissue/Repress. "Like Many Country Troubadours, Chris Stapleton Cut His Teeth As A Songwriter In Nashville, Churning Out Tunes That Wound Up Hits In The Hands Of Others. Kenny Chesney Brought "Never Wanted Anything More" To Number One And Darius Rucker Had A Hit With "Come Back Song," But Those Associations Suggest Stapleton Would Toe A Mainstream Line When He Recorded His 2015 Debut, Traveller. This New Release, However, Suggests Something Rougher And Rowdier -- An Eric Church Without A Metallic Fixation Or A Sturgill Simpson Stripped Of Arty Psychedelic Affectations. Something Closer To A Jamey Johnson, In Other Words, But Where Johnson Often Seems Weighed Down By The Mantle Of A Latter-day Outlaw, Stapleton Is Rather Lithe As He Slides Between All Manners Of Southern Styles. Some Of This Smoothness Derives From Stapleton's Supple Singing. As The Rare Songwriter-for-hire Who Also Has Considerable Performance Chops, Stapleton Is Sensitive To The Needs Of An Individual Song, Something That Is Evident When He's Covering "Tennessee Whiskey" -- A Dean Dillon & Linda Hargrove Tune Popularized By George Jones And David Allan Coe In The Early '80s -- Lending The Composition A Welcome Smolder, But The Strength Of Traveller Lies In How He Can Similarly Modulate The Execution Of His Originals. He Has A Variety Of Songs Here, Too, Casually Switching Gears Between Bluegrass Waltz, Southern Rockers, Crunching Blues, Soulful Slow-burners, And Swaggering Outlaw Anthems -- Every One Of Them Belonging To A Tradition, But None Sounding Musty Due To Stapleton's Casualness. Never Once Does He Belabor His Range, Nor Does He Emphasize The Sharply Sculpted Songs. Everything Flows Naturally, And That Ease Is So Alluring Upon The First Spin Of Traveller That It's Not Until Repeated Visits That The Depth Of The Album Becomes Apparent." AMG Review By Stephen Thomas Erlewine. more

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